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Posted January 23, 2008
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2008 Trends

Top technology, media and telecommunications trends for 2008 showcase society’s struggle with the “double-edged sword” of progress

2008 anticipated to be “the best of times and the worst of times” as Canadians begin to understand that change comes at a price

Toronto – According to a Deloitte study released today, few new technology breakthroughs are expected this year. Instead, Canadians will confront the consequences resulting from recent tectonic shifts in technology 2 and not all of the after-effects are positive. Now in its seventh year, Deloitte’s Technology, Media & Telecommunications (TMT) Predictions is an annual series of global predictions that showcase emerging global TMT trends that may significantly impact businesses in 2008. These predictions are based on research and input from more than 6,000 Deloitte member firm practitioners specializing in TMT, Deloitte clients and alumni, industry analysts, and leading global TMT executives

“Canadians continue to benefit from technological advances in nearly every aspect of our personal and professional lives, but Deloitte’s 2008 TMT Predictions reveal we are finally awakening to the reality that change comes at a price,” explains John Ruffolo, National Leader, Technology, Media

& Telecommunications Industry Group, Deloitte. “For example, putting all of one’s data on a single device is extremely convenient until it is stolen, lost or simply malfunctioning. Further, society must carefully balance the needs of a growing planet with a threatened earth, as our homes’ carbon footprint is suddenly cause for concern.” Each of the three Prediction reports are available online at www.deloitte.com/ca/predictions2008 and will be showcased in a five-stop, cross-country TMT Predictions Roadshow Series in Toronto (January 22), Ottawa (January 24), Montreal (January 25), Vancouver (January 29) and Calgary (January 30).

Deloitte’s Canadian TMT industry group has singled out the top 10 biggest TMT trends that will impact Canadian business in 2008:

2008 TECHNOLOGY PREDICTIONS

• The rising value of digital protection: The value of personal computers (PCs) and other electronic devices no longer rests in their silicon chips, but in the data, files, songs and images they store. Backing up this content to protect it from viruses and theft, and making sure files are forward compatible may fuel growing industries.

• From anonymity to authenticity: The face of the Internet is changing. With concern about online fraud and predators increasing, social networking sites like Facebook have replaced the “secret Internet’s” use of fictitious identities and avatars by requiring users to post their real names, e-mail addresses, and photos. With eight million Facebook users, Canada leads the world in voting for authenticity over anonymity.

• How to manage talent when legacy becomes the future: Almost every business in Canada relies on its IT department. Attracting and retaining skilled employees familiar with cutting-edge technology is no longer the only challenge large companies face as they try to get the most out of their past IT investment. Skill sets, like the ability to program and maintain 30-year-old mainframe computers, remain important — and are becoming increasingly scarce.

• The flight to privacy: It is beneficial when PCs, search engines, online retailers and social networks use our “private” information to help fill in forms faster or make useful suggestions. But, as recent controversies with Facebook, Beacon and other online sites demonstrate, even if privacy has not actually been breached, the online community is highly sensitive to a perception of violated privacy, ensuring it continues to be a flashpoint in 2008.

2008 MEDIA PREDICTIONS

• Stop the presses 2 Online is moving (slowly) to the front page: Canada’s media industry has been a world leader in embracing the online world. In 2008, look for even more web content creeping onto our TV screens and into newspapers, as well as the hiring of non-journalist bloggers as writers and computer programmers, who can add interactive content like searchable databases and mashups. Big legal battles may ensue, as libel laws are tested to see if citizen journalism sites are legally responsible for what they post.

• Overcoming online piracy may not mean the end of counterfeit content: Canada has the highest percentage of high speed Internet users in the world. Another fact to note is that according to one of the six major North American film studios, over 50% of all pirated movies globally are illegally recorded in Montreal. Piracy once seemed unstoppable 2 but technology now provided by companies like Waterloo-based Sandvine (#1 ranked Deloitte Technology Fast 50 award winner in 2007) is allowing network operators to detect, slow down and even stop illegal piracy activities.

• Time for music to get tangible again: Since 1997, Canadian sales of recorded music in physical form plummeted 50%, with songs often enjoyed in their intangible (digital) and often illegally obtained format. However, recent declines in the price of flash memory make it inexpensive to put files on a flash memory chip or low priced MP3 player, meaning music lovers may start rebuilding their music libraries in physical formats again to feed their desire for tangible, permanent objects.

2008 TELECOMMUNICATIONS PREDICTIONS

• How to capitalize on the $10 mobile phone: Advances in semiconductor manufacturing and better integration technologies have led to the era of the $10 phone. By embedding digital phone functionality in machines 2 from ATMs to vending machines, and from freight containers to cars 2 two-way data communications can now create a far more powerful, reliable and cost-effective network of machines.

• Giving mobile GPS direction: Using Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites to determine location is already a multi-billion dollar market for automobiles and hikers. However, just because GPS is included on a phone doesn’t mean consumers will use it more than a few times for novelty. GPS works well for cars, but its need for “line of sight” means getting a signal sometimes requires users to walk away from buildings and into the middle of a street, which may be a big barrier for repeated handset use of GPS.

• Gray is good: the return on investment from making telecommunications accessible to all: For years it was assumed the online community had an average age of about 21. As a result, websites featured weird colours, tiny fonts and loud song tracks. But with aging baby boomers skewing the demographics, Canada is getting older faster, and this demographic controls a lot of wealth. Making telecommunications and technology more accessible to older users 2 bigger buttons, bigger fonts, and better ergonomics 2 may open up this large and under-developed market.

“Technology is playing an increasingly central role in many of the key challenges and issues facing Canadians, and that’s nowhere more apparent than in Canada’s attempts to confront environmental challenges with clean, ‘green technology’ solutions,” says Duncan Stewart, Director of Deloitte Canada Research.

Deloitte has also identified the top five green TMT challenges and trends facing Canadian business in 2008:

2008 GREEN TMT PREDICTIONS

• The challenges and opportunities of water scarcity: Population, economic and environmental pressures may make water the key crisis of the 21st century. Canada has freshwater in abundance, as well as a history of technological innovation in the filtering, remediation, conservation and purification of water, leaving us well placed to help solve global water problems, while confronting our own issues such as how to extract oil from the oil sands without requiring vast amounts of water.

• From zero to green hero : the renaissance of nanotechnology: There has been a stealth explosion in nanotechnology usage in the clean technology arena recently, led by Canada’s National Institute for Nanotechnology in Edmonton. Atomic-level innovation is driving technology in power production, transmission and storage, lighting and LEDs, and cleaning up polluted soils and groundwater.

• Let there be light emitting diodes: In 2008 the conventional light bulb may finally start to be superseded by a viable replacement: the white light emitting diode (LED). But rapid advances in semiconductor manufacturing combined with rising energy prices have shifted the balance, and LEDs are now the superior choice over the long term in most home lighting applications.

• Getting value from virtualisation: Virtualisation, a form of software first used in the 1960s, was one of the most talked about technologies of 2007 due to its proponents’ claims of cost savings, more security, and lower power consumption. In 2008 companies may be more cautious as virtualization is neither a one-size-fits-all solution nor a panacea. However, energy savings are key, especially for new server farms based on “cloud computing” similar to Google.

• The living room moves closer to being Public Enemy Number One: Consumer electronics now use 15% of household electricity consumption — up from 5% in 1980 — with forecasts indicating that number could reach 50% by 2020. Giant screens, especially plasma, use two to four times more power than cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs. And dozens of other household devices are using up energy, even in standby mode. Look for 2008 to bring in more power-efficient home media devices, including ones that that have “real” off switches.

2008 Canadian TMT Predictions

Canadians continue to benefit from technological advances in nearly every aspect of their personal and professional lives — from the wired home to the wireless office. However, Deloitte’s 2008 Technology Media and Telecommunications (TMT) Predictions reveal Canadians are finally awakening to the reality that technology truly is a double-edged sword.

The following is a list of the most significant TMT issues facing Canadian businesses in 2008:

2008 Technology Predictions

1. The rising value of digital protection: instead of “protect and serve” we are now protecting the server

My PC or smartphone is disposable  but what’s stored on it is priceless As personal computers (PCs) and other electronic hardware devices see their prices plummet, they are becoming more and more like bank vaults where their value is found not in their plastic, metal and silicon but in the data, files, songs or images stored in them. Backing up this content to protect it from viruses and theft, and making sure that files are forward compatible are growing industries.

2. From anonymity to authenticity: where everybody knows your name Users are happily exchanging anonymity for usefulness as the Internet is coming of age

Silly user names may have been fun for early generations of cyber geeks 2 but dangerous in a world concerned with protecting our security and our children. The tide has turned, and the cloak of anonymity is being stripped from predators and manipulators as Internet service providers are continuing to divulge user names. The biggest issue in 2008 may be fraud 2 and establishing and proving identity behind transactions may be a critical technology enabler. Another interesting trend is that users are willingly losing their anonymity if they get something for it. Social networking sites like Facebook are the direct opposite of the “secret Internet”: instead of fictitious identities and avatars, Facebook features real names, e-mail addresses, and photos. And there are a lot of Canadians putting the “face” in Facebook: with 8 million users signed up, Canada leads the world in the percentage of our online community who are voting for authenticity over anonymity.

3. Managing talent when legacy is the future: everything old is new again

Why IT departments need to keep their COBOL programmers Almost every business in Canada relies on its information technology department 2 even our resource companies. Getting and keeping skilled employees is always a challenge 2 and for years everybody assumed this problem was about trying to hire and retain staff on the cutting edges of technology. In addition, some skill sets (like being able to program and maintain 30 year old mainframe computers) are still important and becoming increasingly scarce. Are today’s companies going to grind to a halt because of technology that “seems so last century?” We don’t think so…and the talent strategies outlined in Deloitte’s 2007 TechTalent Pulse Survey Report are critical for companies to succeed in 2008.

4. The flight to privacy: the “other” Cookie Monster How well do we want the Internet to know us?

It is a good thing when our PCs, search engines, online retailers and social networks know our “private” information: preferences, patterns and priorities are stored as cookies or on remote servers. They can customize the user experience, help us fill in forms faster and even make useful suggestions. They are like an electronic butler. But what happens when that helper turns into a stalker or a blabbermouth? User pushback, rather than governmental regulation, appears to be the new control mechanism. Recent controversies with Facebook Beacon and other online sites demonstrate that whether or not privacy has actually been breached, the online community is highly sensitive to even a perception of violated privacy. In 2008, as users generate content, they are more than happy to generate (and loudly express) discontent!

2008 Media Predictions

5. Stop the presses! Online is moving (slowly) to the front page: the whole world is watching

…and filming, reporting, writing, arguing, programming and editing Canada’s media industry has been a world leader in accepting and embracing the online world. In many other countries, there has been a seemingly arbitrary division between mainstream and online media worlds, but that wall is coming down. Here in Canada, a number of print and broadcast journalists not only cite blogs as news sources 2 they actually have their own blogs and Podcasts! In 2008, look for even more web content that makes it onto our TV screens and into our newspapers, as well as the hiring of non-journalist bloggers as writers and computer programmers who can add interactive content like searchable databases and mashups. This may pose human resources problems as pay scales and work conditions may need to evolve and reflect these new hires. Citizen journalism, still in its infancy except for Korea’s Ohmy News, may make headlines, but is unlikely to make much of an impact on bottom lines. Watch for some big legal battles as libel laws are tested in the online world to determine if citizen journalism sites are legally responsible for what they post.

6. Overcoming online piracy may not mean the end of counterfeit content: the pirate that lives by the (technological) sword, dies by the sword The technologies that once allowed piracy to flourish are being used to turn the tables

Canada has the highest percentage of high speed Internet users in the world. That technological lead has its downside as faster speeds sometimes mean more illegal downloads. We have another undesirable accolade 2 according to 20th Century Fox, over 50% of all pirated movies globally are illegally recorded in Montreal. Piracy seemed unstoppable 2 but technology now provided by companies like Waterloo-based Sandvine (#1 ranked Deloitte Technology Fast 50 award winner in 2007) is allowing network operators to detect, slow down and even stop illegal piracy activities. Deep packet inspection may not be a panacea on its own, as more may also continue to be done through tougher copyright laws, heftier fines and more effective user education campaigns. Better digital rights management technology may also be a more prominent weapon in the fight against piracy.

7. Time for music to get tangible again: how do you gift wrap an MP3 file? Or to quote Olivia Newton-John: “Let’s Get Physical” The last decade has seen Canadian sales of recorded music in physical form plummet 2 down 20% in 2007 alone, and down more than 50% since 1997. The songs are still being listened to, but in their intangible (digital) and usually illegally obtained, format. At the same time, artists are making more and more money from concerts, with $100 million tours and multiyear Las Vegas contracts becoming the norm. However, recent declines in the price of flash memory means that it is now so inexpensive to put files on a flash memory chip or on a low priced MP3 player that users may start rebuilding their musical libraries in physical formats again 2 fulfilling our desire for tangible, permanent objects and allowing us to collect and display our music as we used to. Even better for artists and the recording industry, consumers may likely pay a premium for a physical version of an album, while new technology may make piracy more difficult.

2008 Telecommunication Predictions

8. How to capitalize on the $10 mobile phone: ultra-cheap phones may enable machines to talk to each other

Connecting machines to the network makes them more valuable Canada is a laggard in the adoption of mobile phones 2 at a 60% penetration rate we trail every other country in the developed world. With lots of room for growth, Canada is less aware of looming global handset saturation, however in contrast, more than 40 countries worldwide have more mobile phones than people. In addition, large sections of the world with low penetration rates have no cellular coverage or a population that is too poor to afford any phone, no matter how inexpensive. So what can handset makers and network providers do to continue their incredible historical growth? Advances in semiconductor manufacturing and better integration technologies have created the advent of the $10 phone. By embedding cell functionality in machines 2 from ATMs to vending machines, and from freight containers to cars 2 two-way data communications can now create a far more powerful, reliable and cost effective network of machines. In addition to selling mobile phones to people, there are another 3 billion machines that might make happy little silicon customers, none of which are likely to complain about their last bill.

9. Giving mobile GPS direction: location, location, location These are the three things that matter most in cellular technologies Using Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites to determine location is already a multi-billion dollar market for automobiles and hikers. In 2007, cell phone manufacturers entered bidding wars for the underlying map software as falling GPS chipset prices have allowed them to incorporate location functionality on all but the most basic handsets. However, just because they can include GPS on a phone doesn’t mean they should, nor does it mean consumers may use it more than a few times for novelty. GPS works well for cars, but its need for “line of sight” means getting a signal sometimes requires users to walk away from buildings and into the middle of a street, which may prevent repeat handset use of GPS. Interestingly, Canadian companies are prominent in the location market 2 using both GPS and cellular technologies.

10. Gray is good : the return on investment from making telecommunications accessible to all: the rise of the Silver Surfer The Internet isn’t just for kids any more  some of the faces on Facebook have wrinkles

For years it was assumed that the online community had an average age of about 21. As a result, websites featured weird colours, tiny fonts and loud song tracks. Mobile phone designs became smaller and smaller, which meant ever smaller buttons. Social networks were restricted to high school or university students. But with an aging baby boom skewing the demographics, Canada is getting older faster, and this demographic disproportionately controls more wealth than even their numbers would suggest. Deloitte’s 2007 Media Democracy Survey reveals that individuals over 61 want to be online, they use it for entertainment and information, and more than 25% even create their own user-generated content. Making telecom and technology more accessible to the older user may tap a large and under-developed market. Bigger buttons, bigger fonts, and better ergonomics are all just a start.

Top Five 2008 Green TMT Predictions

1. The challenges and opportunities of water scarcity: water is the new oil Luckily, Canada has lots of both  but not without challenges Oil has surpassed $100 per barrel, the oil sands are in full swing, and the recoverable oil from the sands puts Canada solidly in second place in estimated global oil reserves, behind only Saudi Arabia. Population, economic and environmental pressures make it likely the oil crisis of the 20th century may be echoed by a water crisis in the 21st century. Canada has freshwater in abundance, as more of our surface area is lake water than any other country in the world, and our rivers discharge almost 10% of all the renewable freshwater globally, while supporting 0.5% of the global population. Despite the profusion of domestic fresh water, Canada also has a history of technological innovation in the filtering, remediation, conservation and purification of water. There are three key Canadian trends relating to water scarcity. 1) Global warming is melting glaciers, and much of our available summer water is glacier derived. What will we do when they’re gone? 2) The oil sands are an immense resource, but it takes four barrels of water to produce a single barrel of oil. Will our oil bounty ironically endanger our water supply? 3) Global water shortages increase the pressure for desalination plants, but require enormous energy inputs. Burning fossil fuels seems like a poor solution, and many are advocating nuclear power. As a popular reactor choice in the developing world, what role will Canada’s CANDU technology play in creating fresh water without creating greenhouse gases?

2. From zero to green hero : the renaissance of nanotechnology: how something very small could solve some very big problems Making molecules do our dirty work

Just after the telecom bubble burst, there was a short-lived boom and bust in nanotechnology. Premised on the ability to manufacture technology and biotechnology at a cellular or molecular scale, the industry was forecast to grow to over $10 billion in annual revenues. Stocks that happened to have the phrase “nano” in their name soared hundreds of percentage points in weeks. By 2007, the stocks were back down, the industry was under attack from doomsday scenarios and nanotech was viewed as yet another over-hyped technology with no future. But for all of nanotech’s limited successes in life sciences and conventional technology, there has actually been a stealth explosion in nanotech usage in the clean technology arena.

By some estimates, the single biggest user of nanotech today is for environmental applications. Atomic-level innovation is driving technology in power production, transmission and storage, lighting and LEDs, filtering and desalinating water, cleaning up polluted soils and groundwater, and controlling automotive emissions. Canada is at the forefront of some of these initiatives led by the National Institute for Nanotechnology in Edmonton.

3. Let there be light emitting diodes: the year when LEDs go green (not literally) They’re bright enough, they’re cheap enough, and doggone it, people are starting to like them

How many years does it take to change a light bulb? About 130 years (and counting) in the case of the incandescent light bulb, a technology which has long been recognized as an imperfect approach to shedding light. But in 2008 the conventional light bulb may finally start to be superseded by a viable replacement: the white light emitting diode (LED). For years LEDs were too expensive, gave off the wrong colour of light and were suitable for only certain applications (traffic lights, automotive turn signals, etc.) But rapid advances in semiconductor manufacturing combined with rising energy prices has shifted the balance, and LEDs are now the superior choice over the long term in most home lighting applications. The first widespread use of LEDs was in digital watches that told the time with a red glow. Although most LEDs will likely emit a whiter light in the future, their true hue may really be “green”, as they offer dramatically lower power consumption, as well as clean manufacturing and disposal.

4. Getting value from virtualisation: rethinking the virtual machine revolution The machines may be virtual, but the environmental benefits are real Virtualisation, a form of software first used in the 1960s, was one of the most talked about technologies of 2007. It is claimed to be a technology that offers cost savings, better security, better use of resources, better disaster recovery and lower power consumption. While 2007 was characterized by a rush to evaluate or deploy virtualization, in 2008 companies may be more cautious as virtualization is neither a one-size-fits-all solution nor a panacea. Even as some assumptions about cost and security are being made, the energy savings driver is likely to be key, especially for the new server farms that are driving “cloud computing” similar to Google. Recent estimates suggest that these massive collections of computers will represent 5% of world electricity demand by 2010. Canadian virtualization companies like Platespin (#2 ranked Deloitte Technology Fast 50 award winner in 2007) are helping transform server farm power hogs into energy sipping piglets.

5. The living room moves closer to being Public Enemy Number One: media aren’t just reporting on environmental problems, they are contributing to them too You can now destroy the planet without leaving home In our guiltier moments, we all know that driving SUVs, filling the stratosphere with jet pollution and not recycling makes us environmental sinners. Instead, we figured that sitting in our living rooms with the thermostat turned down while we watched hockey was an environmentally friendly activity. We may, however, want to check the math before counting on David Suzuki’s blessings. Consumer electronics now use 15% of household electricity consumption, up from 5% in 1980. And forecasts say that number could reach 50% by 2020. Giant screens, especially plasma, use two to four times more power than CRT TVs. And dozens of other household devices are using up energy, even when we think they are in standby mode. When they say protecting the environment begins at home, that has to include home entertainment. Look for 2008 to bring in more power efficient home media devices, including ones that that have “real” off switches.

2008 TMT Predictions theme

2008 may be the best of times and the worst of times and the future is a double-edged sword

The 2007 Deloitte TMT Predictions were radical in nature 2 advances in technology, changes in the media landscape and entirely new forms of telecommunications amounted to a virtual revolution. The subsequent twelve months saw almost all of them come true, but it also saw the pace of change slow as we are now seeing fewer breakthroughs and more incremental change in the TMT space.

The 2008 TMT Predictions are more evolutionary than revolutionary. They are about the implications, consequences and ramifications of last year’s violent change 2 and not all of those aftereffects are positive. Charles Dickens famously described the aftermath of a much earlier revolution as being both “the best of times and the worst of times.” So it is with the 2008 TMT Predictions.

For example, being able to put all of one’s data on a single device is liberating until it is stolen or lost. How does society balance anonymity and authenticity, the needs of a growing planet with a threatened earth, or privacy in a world where machines talk to each other and know where you are?

The opportunities and threats that are found in the 2008 TMT Predictions are less lethal, but every bit as razor-sharp as the guillotine that reigned two centuries ago.

2008 Global TMT Predictions

2008 Technology Predictions

1. Getting value from virtualization: virtualization of the enterprise working environment is likely to make steady gains, although companies are likely to question its panacea status

2. How to manage talent when legacy becomes the future: a greater skills shortage may emerge, sometimes as a result of erstwhile legacy technologies being viewed as the future

3. Let there be light emitting diodes: LED technology may start to supersede the incandescent light bulb

4. From zero to green hero 2 the renaissance of nanotechnology: the image of nanotechnology may be enhanced through a growing awareness of its ability to better the environment

5. From anonymity to authenticity: the ability to be anonymous on the Internet may decline as users, traders and regulators call for more widespread authentication of users’ identities

6. The rising value of digital protection: earning revenues from personal computers may become less about selling equipment and more about selling services, particularly for data protection

7. The flight to privacy: privacy may become a key selling point for many online businesses

8. XBRL goes XL: XBRL, a new reporting language for corporations may well become increasingly widespread

9. A digital divide for the digerati: a digital divide separating advanced digital users and their own data may deepen, due to incompatible standards

10. The challenges and opportunities of water scarcity: the technology sector will need to address the increasing scarcity of man’s most precious resource (water) in both how it’s used and solutions technology can provide

2008 Media Predictions

1. Obstacles ahead for the online advertisement: potential obstacles may arise for online advertising

2. Forget the e-Book 2 bring on e-Reference: a novel reinvention of the e-Book

3. The living room moves closer to being public enemy number one: the growing carbon footprint of the living room may become an issue

4. Long live traditional television, thanks to Internet television: and increasingly complementary relationship may emerge between Internet TV and its broadcast cousin

5. Overcoming online piracy may not mean the end of counterfeit content: the decline of online piracy could lead to a growth in counterfeiting

6. The movie theater becomes about more than just the movies: the diversification of movie theaters

7. Time for music to get tangible again: the possible reemergence of music as a tangible product as opposed to a virtual product

8. Stop the presses! Online is moving (slowly) to the front page: the legitimization of the Internet’s newsmakers

9. Offshoring gets bigger and more creative in the media sector: the growth in offshoring may increasingly impact the media sector

10. Converging technology and media: don’t forget the business plan!: the continued travails of convergence between media and technology

2008 Telecommunications Predictions

1. From credit crunch to communications crisis?: the impact of a possible economic downturn on the telecommunications sector

2. How to capitalize on the $10 mobile phone: the growing viability of a machine-tomachine market is catalyzed by the imminent arrival of the $10 mobile phone

3. The disruption of disruption: incumbents convert threats into opportunities: a more positive approach to disruption in the telecommunications sector

4. Giving mobile GPS direction: how to make the convergence of GPS and mobile technology a commercial success

5. Exploiting new media’s growing need for communication: the growing importance of communications to new media companies

6. Getting mobile indoors may spur network sharing: the rise of mobile network sharing as a means to get mobile indoors

7. Gray is good : the return on investment from making telecommunications accessible to all: the increasing importance of making communications accessible to all consumers

8. Prey becomes predator: the rising power of emerging market mobile operators: the rise of the emerging market global mobile titan

9. Questioning the need for speed: the uncertain relationship between bandwidth and revenues in the broadband market

10. GSM comes of age: adulthood brings challenges and rewards: the outlook for GSM as it reaches 21 years of age

National spokespeople

Duncan Stewart

Director, Deloitte Canada Research

Technology, Media & Telecommunications Industry Practice Duncan Stewart is the Director of Deloitte Canada Research in the areas of Technology, Media & Telecommunications (TMT), and Life Sciences. He is also a member of Deloitte’s national TMT executive team.

Duncan has almost two decades of experience in the TMT industry. As an analyst and portfolio manager, Duncan has provided research or made investments in the entire Canadian technology and telecommunications sector. He has written research on names such as Nortel and Celestica, and been a venture capital investor in Research In Motion among others. Duncan is founder and CEO of Duncan Stewart Asset Management, which invests in companies based on innovation or disruption, many of them in the TMT space. Prior to that, Duncan was a co-founder of Tera Capital, Canada’s first high tech and biotech money manager, where he was responsible for managing both mutual funds and VC funds. In the mid 1990s, Duncan managed a $120 million small cap high tech/biotech fund at a large Canadian pension fund manager. Duncan has a high profile media presence and is frequently interviewed on technology and biotechnology issues. He has also been a bi-monthly columnist on investing for The National Post since 2000, and has a different biweekly column on green investing for CBC Radio. Duncan is Chartered Financial Analyst and holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of British Columbia.

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